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Home > Buckinghamshire > Lee Common > The Bugle

The Bugle

The Bugle, Lee Common

Picture source: Rob Farrow


 
The Bugle was situated on Oxford Street.
 
I worked as a barman at this pub in the late 1970's. As far as I can recall it was owned by a Mr. Ken & Marjorie Webb together with their son Anthony (who I believe still lives there). Ken and Marjorie ran a general store there. Marjorie ran the store whilst Ken ran a joinery business at (I believe) Aston Clinton. Ken researched the history of his property and discovered It was originally a beer house. He succeeded in applying for a full licence in the early 1970's. He then closed the general store and converted the premises back to a fully licensed public house. I used to drink there when it first opened and one evening Ken look quite flustered as his wife Marjorie had fallen down the cellar due to the trap door being left open and had sustained a broken heel. Since I was with some of my mates all wanting serving, Ken said "If you want your beer - come and help me behind the bar"! I worked that evening and fell into a routine of 6 sessions a week over some six years. They were a wonderful family who showed nothing but kindness to all the the villagers and staff alike. Ken contracted prostate cancer whilst I worked there, leaving Marjorie to cope on her own. Following Marjorie's death some time afterwards, Anthony (their son) lives/lived as a recluse in the property. I heard that he had his Mother buried in the car park of the pub.
R Hazell (February 2013)

 
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Other Photos
Date of photo: 1991

Image taken from the Sharing Wycombe's Old Photographs website www.swop.org.uk, and shown with the permission of the copyright holder High Wycombe Library